Explaining the key scientific ideas, technologies, and policies relevant to the global climate crisis.

Recent Episode
Video Epsiode 1.4

Social Cost of Carbon

How are the benefits of new climate policies weighed against the costs of their implementation? Climate economists and scientists have created a value called the social cost of carbon in order to better understand the cost/benefit relationship of climate policies and regulations.

This value is difficult to quantify, with factors such as future societal wealth and global climate damages (such as species extinction) that are impossible to know.

Find out how the social cost of carbon is calculated, how it should, perhaps, be calculated, and why the effort to quantify this value is necessary despite its imperfections with the help of two climate experts, Dr. Tamma Carleton of UC Santa Barbara and Dr. Bob Kopp of Rutgers University.

Featuring:

Bob Kopp
Rutgers University

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Bob Kopp

Rutgers University

Dr. Kopp is a climate scientist and climate policy scholar at Rutgers University where he serves as director of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

He has published over 100 articles on climate science, and is a lead author in the upcoming 2021 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report. He has also served in the U.S. Department of Energy where he helped introduce the social cost of carbon into governmental decision-making and played a key role in the Super-Efficient Equipment and Appliance Initiative.

Tamma Carleton
UCSB

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Tamma Carleton

UCSB

Tamma Carleton is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at UC Santa Barbara and an Affiliate of the Climate Impact Lab.

She joined Bren after a postdoc at the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago. Dr. Carleton completed her PhD in Agricultural & Resource Economics at UC Berkeley where she was an EPA STAR Fellow and a Doctoral Fellow in the Global Policy Lab at the Goldman School of Public Policy. Her research focuses on questions at the intersection of environmental change and economic development.

Date: 06.14.2021 Read Transcript Running Time: 9 min
Recent Podcast
Podcast Epsiode 1.7

Housing Market Climate Risk with Amine Ouazad

Dr. Amine Ouazad speaks with Climate Now about how climate could spark the next financial crisis.

Sea levels are rising, storms are worsening, and flooding is consistently exceeding FEMA’s 100-year floodplain maps. Yet, an increasing percentage of new mortgages are used to purchase homes in at-risk areas. And lenders are selling mortgages in areas hit by hurricanes at higher rates to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, who are backed by American taxpayers, according to research done by Dr. Amine Ouazad, Professor of Economics at HEC Montreal.

Podcast Show Notes

Featuring:

Amine Ouazad
Professor of Economics

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Amine Ouazad

Professor of Economics

Dr. Amine Ouazad is a professor of economics at HEC Montreal where he holds the endowed research professorship in “Urban and Real Estate Economics.” Dr. Ouazad is also a Senior Fellow at Johns Hopkins 21st Century Cities Initiative.

Date: 06.10.2021 Running Time: 34 min
Recent Podcast

Dr. Sergey Paltsev, Deputy Director of MIT’s Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, spoke with Climate Now hosts James Lawler and Katherine Gorman about climate projections and the tools he and his colleagues at MIT use to communicate projected outcomes to policymakers and the public.

Featuring:

Sergey Paltsev
Deputy Director of the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

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Sergey Paltsev

Deputy Director of the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

Sergey Paltsev is the Deputy Director of the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, the MIT Energy-at-Scale Center, and a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Energy Initiative and MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research. He is also the lead modeler in charge of the MIT Economic Projection and Policy Analysis model of the world economy. His research covers energy economics, climate policy, and advanced energy technologies.

Date: 06.07.2021 Running Time: 22 min
Recent Episode
Video Epsiode 1.3

Costs of Climate Change

Featuring Dr. Ian Bolliger of Rhodium Group and Climate Impact Lab

It’s hard to put a dollar number on the destruction of the great barrier reef. And we don’t know exactly how much it’s going to warm where. But we can take physical estimates and quantify the range of monetary impacts that climate change might cost.  In this video, we examine the projected costs of climate change in human health, agriculture, sea level rise and extreme weather, labor and energy, and migration.

Featuring:

Ian Bolliger
Rhodium Group

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Ian Bolliger

Rhodium Group

Ian Bolliger is a Climate Data Scientist for the Energy & Climate practice at Rhodium Group and an Affiliate at the Climate Impact Lab. Ian constructs and applies simulation-based models to understand the economic impacts of climate change. His work, which focuses on extreme event risk, forms part of the Climate Impact Lab’s efforts to understand the costs of climate change, and it contributes to a variety of Rhodium’s other climate impacts projects. Ian comes to Rhodium after completing his PhD in Energy and Resources at UC Berkeley, where he developed approaches to better leverage process-based modeling in the field of econometrics. Prior to that, he worked as a disease modeler at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University and a Master’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley.

Date: 06.01.2021 Read Transcript
Recent Podcast

Dr. Ian Bolliger, Climate Data Scientist at Rhodium Group and affiliate of the Climate Impact Lab, joins Climate Now podcast hosts Katherine Gorman and James Lawler to explain how we measure the costs of climate change (in dollar terms) across sectors and communities. Putting a number on these costs can help businesses, governments, and communities better allocate funding towards adaptation and prevention.

Featuring:

Ian Bolliger
Rhodium Group

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Ian Bolliger

Rhodium Group

Ian Bolliger is a Climate Data Scientist for the Energy & Climate practice at Rhodium Group and an Affiliate at the Climate Impact Lab. Ian constructs and applies simulation-based models to understand the economic impacts of climate change. His work, which focuses on extreme event risk, forms part of the Climate Impact Lab’s efforts to understand the costs of climate change, and it contributes to a variety of Rhodium’s other climate impacts projects. Ian comes to Rhodium after completing his PhD in Energy and Resources at UC Berkeley, where he developed approaches to better leverage process-based modeling in the field of econometrics. Prior to that, he worked as a disease modeler at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University and a Master’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley.

Date: 06.01.2021 Running Time: 22 min
Recent Episode
Video Epsiode 1.1

How we know it’s happening

How do we know the climate is changing? How do we know that change is being caused by human activities? Climate Now video hosts Ozak Esu and James Lawler delve into the science that answers these questions with MIT climate scientist Kerry Emanuel.

Featuring:

Kerry Emanuel
MIT

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Kerry Emanuel

MIT

Kerry Emanuel is a prominent meteorologist and climate scientist who specializes in moist convection in the atmosphere, and tropical cyclones. His research interests focus on tropical meteorology and climate, with a specialty in hurricane physics. His interests also include cumulus convection, the role of clouds, water vapor, and upper-ocean mixing in regulation of climate, and advanced methods of sampling the atmosphere in aid of numerical weather prediction.

Emanuel received an S.B. degree in Earth and Planetary Sciences and a Ph.D. in Meteorology (1978) both from MIT. After completing his doctorate, he joined the faculty of the Atmospheric Sciences department of the University of California at Los Angeles where he remained for three years, with a brief hiatus filming tornadoes in Oklahoma and Texas. He joined the faculty at MIT in 1981 and is now the co-director of the Lorenz Center and the Cecil & Idea Green Professor of Atmospheric Science.

Professor Emanuel is the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and three books, including Divine Wind: The History and Science of Hurricanes, published by Oxford University Press, and What We Know about Climate Change, published by the MIT Press.

Date: 05.16.2021 Read Transcript Running Time: 7 min
Recent Podcast
Podcast Epsiode 1.1

Climate 101 with Kerry Emanuel

Professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT
Co-director of the Lorenz Centre

Dr. Kerry Emanuel, professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT and co-founder of the MIT Lorenz Center discusses how we can solve climate change.

Featuring:

Kerry Emanuel
MIT

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Kerry Emanuel

MIT

Kerry Emanuel is a prominent meteorologist and climate scientist who specializes in moist convection in the atmosphere, and tropical cyclones. His research interests focus on tropical meteorology and climate, with a specialty in hurricane physics. His interests also include cumulus convection, the role of clouds, water vapor, and upper-ocean mixing in regulation of climate, and advanced methods of sampling the atmosphere in aid of numerical weather prediction.

Emanuel received an S.B. degree in Earth and Planetary Sciences and a Ph.D. in Meteorology (1978) both from MIT. After completing his doctorate, he joined the faculty of the Atmospheric Sciences department of the University of California at Los Angeles where he remained for three years, with a brief hiatus filming tornadoes in Oklahoma and Texas. He joined the faculty at MIT in 1981 and is now the co-director of the Lorenz Center and the Cecil & Idea Green Professor of Atmospheric Science.

Professor Emanuel is the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and three books, including Divine Wind: The History and Science of Hurricanes, published by Oxford University Press, and What We Know about Climate Change, published by the MIT Press.

Date: 04.19.2021 Running Time: 15 min
Recent Episode
Video Epsiode 1.2

How dirty are we?

Emissions of greenhouse gases are rising dramatically worldwide, but it can be challenging to grasp just how much we are emitting, and where those emissions come from. Here we break down how much we are emitting in total, by country and region, and by economic sector. We also discuss the relationship between key economic and demographic variables and greenhouse gas emissions.

Date: 05.17.2021 Read Transcript Running Time: 8 min
Recent Podcast
Podcast Epsiode 1.2

Sea Level Rise with Bob Kopp

Director of the Institute of Earth, Ocean,
and Atmospheric Sciences at Rutgers University

Hosts Katherine Gorman and James Lawler interview Dr. Bob Kopp of Rutgers University about sea level rise and how we estimate the costs of climate damages. Dr. Kopp is one of the foremost experts in climate science, and has held positions both in the Department of Energy and in academia. Our conversation spans two of Dr. Kopp’s areas of focus: sea level rise and the social cost of carbon.

Featuring:

Bob Kopp
Rutgers University

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Bob Kopp

Rutgers University

Dr. Kopp is a climate scientist and climate policy scholar at Rutgers University where he serves as director of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

He has published over 100 articles on climate science, and is a lead author in the upcoming 2021 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report. He has also served in the U.S. Department of Energy where he helped introduce the social cost of carbon into governmental decision-making and played a key role in the Super-Efficient Equipment and Appliance Initiative.

Date: 05.17.2021 Running Time: 19 min